The Health Law

It was men who started it. It may be women who finished it.

The Senate effort to repeal the Affordable Care Act, a process that began with 13 Republican men drafting a plan behind closed doors, collapsed Tuesday, as three Republicans said they would not support an ultimately futile attempt to simply roll back the current health care law without a replacement.

Though all three are women, their objections have little to do with their sex and more to do with the legislation’s cuts to Medicaid. In a twist, that aligns them with President Trump’s campaign promise not to touch Medicaid, which helps low-income people, pregnant women and people with disabilities, among others, as well as those eligible under the Affordable Care Act’s expansion of the program in 31 states and the District of Columbia.

Who are these senators, and why did they break with their party’s leaders?

Senator Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia

Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia became the first woman elected to the Senate in her state’s history in 2014. CreditDoug Mills/The New York Times

Ms. Capito became the first woman elected to the Senate in her state’s history in 2014, after serving 14 years in the House of Representatives. Since then, she has proved open